[WIN] BRICS Journal catches the #FillUpFNBStadium Fever

What started out as a dream for South African Hip Hop sensation, Cassper Nyovest, has evolved into a a fully-fledged campaign.

#FillUpFNBStadium is in its third year running and has, over time, caught the attention of major corporations in and around South Africa.  Flying the flag high for youth culture in the country, Cassper (real name Refiloe Maele Phoolo), is putting together a worldclass production amounting to R15 million, R5,2 million of which goes towards  the stage. To help ease the financial strain, three major sponsors: Ciroc, SABC 1 and Budweiser have come on board

BRICS Journal is in full support of the development of youth culture around the BRICS countries, especially South Africa. Keep an eye on our page for an exclusive interview with Cassper Nyovest.

WIN
You could stand in line to win a golden circle ticket to #FillUpFNBStadium taking place on 2 December. Winners will be chosen and will need to collect their tickets from our offices. Complete the form below and answer this easy question:  Which artist is aiming to fill up FNB Stadium on 2 December 2017?

[contact-form-7 id=”1906″ title=”BRICS Journal catches the #FillUpFNBStadium Fever”]

 

Standard terms and conditions for the #FillUpFNB ticket giveaway competition (the “Competition”)

  1. Introduction
    • This Competition is promoted and sponsored by BRICS Journal (Pty) Ltd (the “Promoter”).
  2. General Rules
    • By participating in the Competition, a participant:
      • agrees to be bound by these terms and conditions without exception; and
      • who is under the age of 18 years, warrants that he/she has been duly assisted by his/her legal guardian, and that his/her legal guardian consents to the participant’s participation in the Competition and the possession of the prize/s in the event that the participant wins such prizes. A participant who is under the age of 18 years will be disqualified from the competition if he/she is unable to prove that he/she has been duly assisted by his/her legal guardian, and that his/her legal guardian consents to his/her possession of the prize/s in the event that such participant wins such prizes.
The statements made in the paragraph above contain acknowledgments of facts by the participant. The participant must read the statements made in the paragraph above carefully and ensure that they are correct, as he/she will not be able to deny the truth of the statements. The Promoter and/or other persons may also have claims and other rights against the participant as a result of the statements made above.

 

 

 

 

 

  • A participant is entitled to enter into this competition if he/she is a natural person resident in the Republic of South Africa.
  • The Competition is not open to directors, members, partners, employees, agents or consultants of the Promoter, any person who directly or indirectly controls or is controlled by the Promoter, or any supplier of goods or services in connection with the Competition, or the spouses, life partners, business partners or immediate family members.
  • The Competition runs from 27 November 2017 to 30 November 2017 (the “Competition Period“). There is no fee charge for participating in the Competition, other than the cost of accessing the Internet.
  • The prizes are not exchangeable for cash and are not transferable.
  • The Promoter reserves the right, acting reasonably, to amend the rules of the Competition at any time during the Competition.
  • The Promoter also reserves the right to cancel the Competition at any stage, and without notice if circumstances beyond its reasonable control prevent the Promoter from continuing to conduct the Competition. In the event of such cancellation, as far as the law allows, all participants acknowledge that they will have no recourse against the Promoter in respect thereof.
  • As far as the law allows, neither the Promoter, its associated companies, nor the directors, officers, employees or agents of the Promoter shall be liable for any loss or damage, whether direct, indirect, consequential or otherwise, arising from any cause whatsoever which may be suffered as a result of entering the Competition, the provision of the prizes, or any act or omission of any other person. This clause 8 does not purport to limit or exempt the Promoter for any loss directly or indirectly attributable to its gross negligence or that of any person acting for or controlled by it.
This paragraph limits and excludes obligations, liabilities and legal responsibilities which the Promoter may have towards the participant and also limits and excludes the participant’s rights and remedies against the Promoter and other persons.

 

 

 

 

  • These rules shall be governed by the laws of South Africa. The participant consents to the non-exclusive jurisdiction of the High Court of South Africa, Gauteng Local Division, Johannesburg, in respect of all matters arising out of or in connection with the Competition or these rules.
  • If any provision of these rules is found to be invalid or unenforceable by any court of competent jurisdiction, then that provision shall be severed from these rules and shall not affect the validity or enforceability of any remaining provisions.
  • It is not intended that any provision of these rules contravenes any provision of the Consumer Protection Act, 68 of 2008, and therefore all provisions of these rules must be treated as being qualified, if necessary, to ensure that the provisions of the Consumer Protection Act are complied with.
  • The Promoter shall not be responsible for a participant’s failure to access the Competition for any reason whatsoever including, by way of example only, as a consequence of communications or network failures.
  • The winners may be asked to participate in publicity and marketing activities, including having their photograph taken, but the winners are entitled to decline to do so.
  • If you have any questions about how to enter, or in connection with the prize draw, or if you wish to access a copy of these rules, you may email roxanne@bricsjournal.com or info@bricsjournal.com.
  1. How to Enter:
    • In order to enter the Competition, participants will be required to submit an answer to the question posted on the Promoter’s website at http://bit.ly/2zHrfu8 (the “Website“) on or before 12h00 on 30 November 2017.
    • The first fifty participants to correctly answer the question posted on the Website will receive two golden circle tickets to the #FillUpFNB concert which is taking place at the FNB Stadium on 2 December 2017.
    • Winners will receive their prizes
  2. Winners & Prizes
    • The determination of the winners is final and no correspondence will be entered into.
    • Each Winner will be contacted via email on or before 30 November 2017 on the same email address that was submitted by the Winner when entering the Competition. Winners will be required to collect their tickets at the Promoter’s offices located at Building 3, Parc Nicol, 3001 William Nicol Drive, Bryanston, 2021 before 17h00 on 1 December 2017.  If the Winner(s) is unable to collect their tickets during this time, the Winner(s) will also be given an opportunity to collect their tickets at a central point at the concert venue from Nadine Smith.  She will be at the venue from 19:00 until 20:00.  Winners that are unable to collect their tickets from the Promoter’s offices will be personally notified of Nadine Smith’s contact details.
    • In the event that a winner is ineligible to accept a prize in terms of the competition rules, or is unable or fails to accept a prize for any reason whatsoever, a replacement winner will be selected from remaining qualifying participants.
    • The Promoter reserves the right to select an alternative winner in the event that it reasonably believes, in its sole discretion that the selected winner has contravened any of these terms and conditions or is suspected of any irregularities or fraudulent activities. The Promoter’s decision shall be final and no correspondence will be entered into.

[VIEWPOINT] Mugabe and His Country: A Chinese Perspective

By Liu Yunyun (Assistant Executive Editor of Beijing Review)

It came as a big surprise to China that the long-time leader of Zimbabwe and an old friend of China’s had been confined and forced to resign in a “military coup,” despite the fact that many had long questioned whether the nation’s revolutionary leader could effectively lead the poverty-stricken nation to industrialisation and modernisation.

Though his resignation is deemed celebratory by many – some of his people and the so-called media elites from the West – his achievements and failures are part of the nation’s history and legacy which will remain true and significant in understanding this Southern African nation.

Mugabe visited China several times in the hope of finding support for his government and also the Chinese “secret” to success. But unfortunately, as our great reformer Deng Xiaoping had said to his entourage, after his meetings with Mugabe, “He won’t listen.”

China was once in the same international and domestic position as Zimbabwe: poor, backward, and with foreign sanctions. But eventually, after many twists and turns, it found out its own path for economic and social development, which is: making policy changes in accordance with its own national condition without blindly copying others’ way of governance.

READ MORE: Zimbabwe: Domestic Rivalries, US-China Competition Underlie Political Crisis

When it became evident that the former Soviet Union socialist approach could not help Zimbabwe, Mugabe did not draw lessons from the failure of the “big brother,” but instead, continued down the road of proactive policies in various fields, including the land ownership.

Looking back on history, there are some lessons to be learnt from the rise and fall of Mugabe: reform the system when it is necessary; put aside ideological debate while focusing on development; set up a legal base for transition of power and tenure system. Nonetheless, it’s always easier said than done. It is widely expected that his successor can move the nation forward, however difficult it now seems.

Resigned or not, Mugabe has been, is now, and will always be China’s good friend, and so also his country, Zimbabwe. As China’s Foreign Ministry spokesperson said, China has always adhered to the principle of not interfering in internal affairs of other countries and respects Zimbabwean people’s choice and the choice of Mugabe too. China is committed to cooperation with Zimbabwe to improve the well-being of its people regardless of who its leader will be.

Zimbabwe: Domestic Rivalries, US-China Competition Underlie Political Crisis

By Eric Draitser

On November 14, 2017 military forces in Zimbabwe took control of the streets, sequestered President Robert Mugabe in his residence, and publicly announced that the kinda sorta but not really coup was merely a clean-up operation intended to “target criminals.” While the claim does have some merit – Zimbabwe’s government, like those of nearly all nations in Africa and the Global South, grapples with endemic corruption – it remains difficult to ignore the long and sordid history of military coups in Africa, and then avoid the tendency to view the developments in Zimbabwe through the same lens.

Indeed, most media outlets quickly branded the operation a military coup d’etat.  However, a more critical analysis reveals that this episode is decidedly different from the countless coups that have taken place in the post-colonial history of Africa. In fact, a number of Zimbabwean commentators have made precisely that claim (see here andhere).

George Shire, a London-based political analyst, and veteran of Zimbabwe’s liberation struggle, incisively noted to Al-Jazeera, “The dominance of ZANU-PF [Zimbabwe’s ruling party since liberation] on the political landscape in Zimbabwe is not in question…What you see is really a leadership contest taking place – Zimbabwean style.” This point is critical in that, typically, a coup would overthrow not only the President, but an entire ruling party in favor of a military that either assumes control itself or installs some new power structure or party. In this case, however, the military has intervened to block one faction of the ruling party from assuming power in favor of another faction.

On November 14, 2017 military forces in Zimbabwe took control of the streets, sequestered President Robert Mugabe in his residence, and publicly announced that the kinda sorta but not really coup was merely a clean-up operation intended to “target criminals.” While the claim does have some merit – Zimbabwe’s government, like those of nearly all nations in Africa and the Global South, grapples with endemic corruption – it remains difficult to ignore the long and sordid history of military coups in Africa, and then avoid the tendency to view the developments in Zimbabwe through the same lens.

Indeed, most media outlets quickly branded the operation a military coup d’etat.  However, a more critical analysis reveals that this episode is decidedly different from the countless coups that have taken place in the post-colonial history of Africa. In fact, a number of Zimbabwean commentators have made precisely that claim (see here and here).

George Shire, a London-based political analyst, and veteran of Zimbabwe’s liberation struggle, incisively noted to Al-Jazeera, “The dominance ofC [Zimbabwe’s ruling party since liberation] on the political landscape in Zimbabwe is not in question…What you see is really a leadership contest taking place – Zimbabwean style.” This point is critical in that, typically, a coup would overthrow not only the President, but an entire ruling party in favor of a military that either assumes control itself or installs some new power structure or party. In this case, however, the military has intervened to block one faction of the ruling party from assuming power in favor of another faction.

The political turmoil in Zimbabwe is a product of both domestic factional rivalries and broader international political intrigue. Don’t let the corporate media impose its usual superficial narrative on the events in Zimbabwe; as with all things Africa, there’s so much more than meets the eye.

On November 14, 2017 military forces in Zimbabwe took control of the streets, sequestered President Robert Mugabe in his residence, and publicly announced that the kinda sorta but not really coup was merely a clean-up operation intended to “target criminals.” While the claim does have some merit – Zimbabwe’s government, like those of nearly all nations in Africa and the Global South, grapples with endemic corruption – it remains difficult to ignore the long and sordid history of military coups in Africa, and then avoid the tendency to view the developments in Zimbabwe through the same lens.

Indeed, most media outlets quickly branded the operation a military coup d’etat. However, a more critical analysis reveals that this episode is decidedly different from the countless coups that have taken place in the post-colonial history of Africa. In fact, a number of Zimbabwean commentators have made precisely that claim (see here and here).

George Shire, a London-based political analyst, and veteran of Zimbabwe’s liberation struggle, incisively noted to Al-Jazeera, “The dominance of ZANU-PF [Zimbabwe’s ruling party since liberation] on the political landscape in Zimbabwe is not in question…What you see is really a leadership contest taking place – Zimbabwean style.” This point is critical in that, typically, a coup would overthrow not only the President, but an entire ruling party in favor of a military that either assumes control itself or installs some new power structure or party. In this case, however, the military has intervened to block one faction of the ruling party from assuming power in favor of another faction.

Read more

Robert Mugabe’s Resignation Letter

President Robert Mugabe yesterday announced that he was stepping down as the president of Zimbabwe. His official resignation letter was read out by Zimbabwe parliamentary Speaker Jacob Mudenda in Harare where a discussion of an impeachment motion was set to be held.

State House

Harare

Zimbabwe

21 November 2017

The Honourable Jacob Mudenda

Notice of resignation as President of the Republic of Zimbabwe

In terms of the provisions of section 96 (1) of the constitution of Zimbabwe, amendment number 20, 2013. Following my verbal communication with the Speaker of the National Assembly, Advocate Jacob Mudenda at 13:53 hours, 21st November, 2017 intimating my intention to resign as President of the Republic of Zimbabwe, I Robert Gabriel Mugabe in terms of section 96 (1) of the constitution of Zimbabwe hereby formally tender my resignation as the President of the Republic of Zimbabwe with immediate effect.

My decision to resign is voluntary on my part and arises from my concern for the welfare of the people of Zimbabwe and my desire to ensure a smooth, peaceful and non-violent transfer of power that underpins national security, peace and stability.

Kindly give public notice of my resignation as soon as possible as required by section 96 (1) of the constitution of Zimbabwe.

Yours faithfully,

Robert Gabriel Mugabe President of the Republic of Zimbabwe.

Image: CNN

Naspers Video Entertainment announces leadership appointments

Naspers’s Video Entertainment business today announced new appointments to its leadership team.

Calvo Mawela has been appointed CEO of MultiChoice South Africa. In this new role Mawela will be responsible for MultiChoice SA and DStv Media Sales in South Africa. Mark Rayner, current CEO of MultiChoice SA, becomes Chief Operating Officer for MultiChoice South Africa.

Mawela will focus on strategic developments in the pay television industry, while Rayner will focus on ensuring product and operational excellence that will give DStv customers the best entertainment experience.

In addition the company announced the following appointments:

  • Yolisa Phahle, current CEO of M-Net, will step into the role of CEO of General Entertainment
  • Fahmeeda Cassim Surtee has been appointed as CEO of DStv Media Sales in South Africa, with Chris Hitchings continuing as overall CEO of DStv Media Sales
  • Gideon Khobane will continue to head up SuperSport as CEO

“This is a strong leadership team who can to take us into our next phase of growth,” says Imtiaz Patel, Video Entertainment Chief Executive. “While the pay television business faces technological shifts, regulatory and competitor challenges, the core focus remains delivering the best local and international content to our customers, anytime, anywhere on any device.”

“Calvo and Mark are an impressive team who will steer MultiChoice South Africa into the future. Their combination of strategic and operational skill and experience complement each other. Calvo is well-positioned to drive strategy and growth in our South African operations. He has a rich and varied experience in broadcasting and a proven track record in managing complex issues in South Africa and the rest of the continent.”

Mawela, currently executive in charge of regulatory affairs and policy for Video Entertainment, began his career at Sentech where he was responsible for commissioning transmitter sites. He has held senior positions at ICASA, where he was responsible for technical regulations relating to the broadcasting industry, Orbicom and MWEB.

Mawela led the planning team on the digital broadcasting plan for South Africa and served as a planning expert to the International Telecommunications Union. He also served as a councillor on the Minister of Communications’ advisory body for digital migration and is a registered professional engineer and a member of the South African Institute of Electrical Engineers.

Mark has proven himself to be able to get the best out of the business operationally,” Patel said. “His focus will be to deliver the best experience to customers in the best possible way, making sure we achieve our business objectives, including financial and customer satisfaction targets, and drive efficiencies.”

Yolisa has over 30 years experience in the entertainment industry, she joined the company in 2005 and has been leading M-Net since 2014. She started her career as a musician and member of Soul II Soul, performed with Duran Duran, has worked as a producer and BBC executive.  Under her leadership, Mzansi Magic was launched and our other local channels which include Africa Magic, Maisha Magic East, Maisha Magic Bongo as well as Zambezi Magic have seen an increased focus in our commitment to African storytelling. In her new role, she will continue to ensure that our customers have access to world class local and international entertainment.

Fahmeeda Cassim Surtee is currently Group Sales and Marketing Director for DStv Media Sales and has been involved in the media industry for more than 24 years. She started her career as sports journalist and advertising consultant at City Press newspaper before joining the MultiChoice Group in 1998 where she has been leading key strategic projects to commercialise digital properties and next generation products.

Cassim Surtee holds a variety of qualifications in media management, strategic marketing, business management and journalism and of her many achievements, she has been a Woman of the Year nominee, has co-authored a book on branding and set up a foundation for women in sport in South Africa.

These leadership appointments are effective immediately.

Everything you need to know about the #FeesCommission

[press statement]

Release of the Report of Commission of Inquiry into the Feasibility of making High Education and Training Fee-free in South Africa

Release of the Report of Commission of Inquiry into the Feasibility of Making High Education and Training Fee-free in South Africa

On 14 January 2016, I established a Commission of Inquiry into Higher Education and Training in order to add into the body of knowledge and evidence that will inform government’s decision making process in pursuit of a sustainable solution to the on-going higher education funding matter.

The Commission was chaired by Honourable Justice Jonathan Arthur Heher, assisted by Adv Gregory Ally and Ms Leah Khumalo.
The terms of reference of the Commission was to enquire into, make findings, report on and make recommendations on the following:
· The feasibility of making higher education and training (higher education) fee-free in South Africa, having regard to:
o The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, all relevant higher and basic education legislation, all findings and recommendations of the various presidential and ministerial task teams as well as all relevant educational policies, reports and guidelines;
o The multiple facets of financial sustainability, analysing and assessing the role of government together with its agencies, students, institutions, business sector and employers in funding higher education and training; and
o The institutional independence and autonomy which should occur visà- vis the financial funding model.

The Commission was expected to complete its work within a period of eight months and to submit its final report to the President within two months of completing its work.

At the request of the Commission the working period of the Commission was extended until 30 June 2017 with the report due within two months of completion of the work.

I received the final report from the Commission on 30 August 2017. I would like to thank Judge Heher and the Commissioners on the work done on this challenging matter. I also thank all stakeholders who made presentations to the Commission, and all who cooperated with the Commission to ensure that its work was done and concluded successfully.

I hereby release the Report of the Commission into the feasibility of making higher education and training fee-free in South Africa.

1. RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE COMMISSION

The recommendations of the Commission can be summarised as follows:

1.1 FUNDING THE POST SCHOOLING EDUCATION AND TRAINING SECTOR
The Commission recommended that government increase Block funding to the Post School Education and Training Sector (PSET) as a whole in line with increased costs for providing quality education and infrastructure needs. The Commission recommended that government increase its expenditure on higher education and training to at least 1% of the GDP, in line with comparable economies. The Commission further recommended that government pay particular attention to the Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges as they cannot perform at their current funding levels.

1.2 STUDENT ACCOMODATION
On student accommodation, the Commission found that there is a severe shortage of student accommodation across the higher education and training sector. The Commission recommended that government adopt an affordable plan to develop more student accommodation and that Historically Disadvantaged Institutions be prioritised. The commission further recommend a Public-Private Partnership approach when responding to the student accommodation challenge.

1.3 ONLINE AND BLENDED LEARNING
On the option of Online and Blended Learning, the Commission recommended that Government must further investigate the viability of “online and blended learning” as an alternative in addressing the funding and capacity challenges facing the current higher education and training sector.

1.4 FUNDING FOR TECHNICAL VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING (TVET) STUDENTS
The Commission made the following recommendations regarding the funding of students at TVET colleges:
· That all students at TVET Colleges should receive fully subsidized free education in the form of grants that cover their full cost of study and that no student should be partially funded.

1.5 POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS
The Commission recommended that the NRF bursaries (based on merit, or other criteria as developed by the NRF) for postgraduate students be retained and expanded when possible. The Commission further recommended for Postgraduate students to have access to a cost-sharing model of government guaranteed Income-Contingency Loans sourced from commercial banks (ICL).

1.6 HISTORIC DEBT
It is recommended that students with debt, who have since graduated, be offered income-contingent loans (ICL) as well.

1.7 NSFAS
The Commission recommend that the participation of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) in the funding of university students be replaced by the ICL system. NSFAS should be retained for the provision of the funding of all TVET students and TVET student support if such retention is considered necessary.

1.8 FUNDING FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
The Commission recommends that all undergraduate and postgraduate students studying at both public and private universities and colleges, regardless of their family background, be funded through a cost-sharing model of government guaranteed Income-Contingency Loans sourced from commercial banks. Through this cost-sharing model, the Commission recommends that commercial banks issue government guaranteed loans to the students that are payable by the student upon graduation and attainment of a specific income threshold. Should the student fail to reach the required income threshold, government bares the secondary liability.

In implementing this model, the Commission recommends that the existing NSFAS model be replaced by a new Income Contingency Loan System.

Should government be opposed to this model, the Commission recommends that government consider the “Ikusasa Student Financial Aid Programme”, an Income Contingency Loan Funding Model proposed by the Ministerial Task Team on Funding for Poor, Working Class and Missing Middle Students.

The Commission further recommend that government considers the introduction of a university fee capping mechanism to avoid the cancelling out effect. Some key points of the ICL model are the following:
· repayment only begins when the student reaches a certain threshold income;
· payments only continue until such a time as the loan is paid off;
· the repayment period could be set to a maximum period so as ensure that payment does not impact on retirement accumulation;
· students could be allowed to settle the loan more quickly should they be able to;
· those who emigrate could be required to pay off the loan before leaving;
· loan is made available to all students ( Private and Public Universities) ;
· No means test;
· The financing of every university student is achieved through a bank loan at a rate favourable to the student. Whether such financing should extend to the full cost of education will depend solely on the choice of the borrower and his need for such an extension;
· Collection and recovery of the loan will be undertaken by SARS through its normal processes.
· The state can guarantee the loan or, better still, purchase the loan, so that the student becomes a debtor in its books. Prof Fioramonti, in his model proposed the inclusion of the banks as lenders to students, with a government guarantee, so as to cover the cost for the initial years.
· No student is obliged to repay a loan unless and until his or her income reaches a specified level. At the lowest specified level the interest rate is at its lowest but will increase in accordance with specified increases in income growth.
· If the loan is not repaid within a specified number of years the balance can be written off.
· The State will repay each student loan to the bank at a given date (say five years from the first advance).

1.9 REGISTRATION FEES
The Commission recommended for the application and registration fees to be scrapped across the board.

WAY FORWARD
The Inter-Ministerial Committee on Higher Education Funding led by the Minister in the Presidency Mr Jeff Radebe, and the Presidential Fiscal Committee whose lead Minister is the Minister of Finance, Mr Malusi Gigaba, are processing the report. I will make a pronouncement on the Report once the Ministers have concluded their work. I have decided to release the Report prior to the conclusion of our work in processing it so that the public can have an opportunity to study the report while we continue with the processing thereof.

For the full report and executive summary click here:
Commission of Inquiry into Higher Education Report.pdf
Commission of Inquiry into Higher Education Report_Executive Summary_0.pdf

Enquiries: Dr Bongani Ngqulunga on 082 308 9373 or bongani@presidency.gov.za

Issued by: The Presidency
Pretoria

Sir Richard Branson thinks 22 on Sloane is the latest hotspot for innovators and entrepreneurs

Founder of the Virgin Group, Sir Richard Branson on Friday morning officially opened the Global Entrepreneurship Week in Johannesburg. This event also doubled as the official opening of 22 on Sloane, the largest startup campus on the African continent.

Said Branson: “Entrepreneurs are the life blood of any economy. They are disruptors and innovators who shape our world for the better. This campus launch is going to help to create a new generation of entrepreneurs who will improve people’s lives across the continent.”

Sir Branson also shared some of his plans for his upcoming space travels, which includes placing 2 000 satellites around the earth.

Also in attendance was Jonathan Ortman, president of the Global Entrepreneurship Network, Premier of Gauteng Province, David Makhura and SA’s Minister of Small Business Development.

More about 22 on Sloane
22 on Sloane is the largest startup campus in Africa. The campus is the first for the Global Entrepreneurship Networkd (GEN) in Africa which offers startups and SMEs a complete turnkey solution to scale, from the initial idea all the way to commercialisation, funding opportunities and access to markets.

In order to qualify for the selection process, you need an innovative, financially viable and scalable concept that can be applied across FinTech, Information &  Communication Tech, Manufacturing, Energy, Education, Health, Tourism, Transportation, Services, Water, Sanitation, Agriculture, Arts an Crafts sectors.

Following your pitch to the panel of experts, you will know within a week whether your application  has been approved or declined.

For more info, head to 22onsloane.co.

Additional Reporting: Global Entrepreneurship Network

Xi’s wisdom offers new insights into global governance

Displayed with permission from China Daily

BEIJING — Xi Jinping Thought on Socialism with Chinese Characteristics for a New Era offers new insights into the improvement of the global governance system, international politicians and analysts said in reading signals from the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China (CPC).

China, under the leadership of the CPC, endorses the common values of the whole mankind, including peace, equity, justice, democracy and freedom, and advocates a world truly shared by all where international affairs are jointly managed, the world order is jointly built, and economic and social progress are shared.

HOLD FAST TO THE CONCEPT OF A WORLD SHARED BY ALL

China champions the development of “a community with a shared future for mankind”, which has been widely accepted by the international community and become an important consensus of global governance.

Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico spoke highly of Xi’s innovative concept of promoting the establishment of a community with a shared future for mankind.

Lord Tu’ivakano, speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Tonga and former prime minister, said China’s impressive feat is an inspiration to developing countries including Tonga.

China has over the past five years set its own independent course governed by a policy of development-for-all, said Michael Steger, president of the Bay Area Chapter of the International Schiller Institute. He attributed China’s achievements to the strong Chinese leadership. His organization is a global political and economic think tank with headquarters in Germany and the United States.

Steger noted that China’s willingness to blaze its own pathway, with an orientation to share the means of development, has now become a stabilizing factor for the world.

With great strength comes great responsibility, and Xi has already displayed that responsibility, said Sourabh Gupta, a senior policy analyst at the Institute for China-America Studies, a Washington-based independent think tank.

IMPROVE GLOBAL GOVERNANCE SYSTEM

As China gradually steps up onto the stage to take part in global governance, international observers have recognized it as a responsible stakeholder.

Speaking on China’s international leadership, Maksym Savrasov, head of the secretariat of Ukraine’s ruling party Petro Poroshenko Bloc “Solidarity”, said the achievements are vividly represented by the initiative on the construction of the Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road (the Belt and Road Initiative), which was put forward by Xi in 2013.

The initiative envisions reviving the ancient overland and maritime silk trade routes that connect Asia with Europe and Africa, boosting inter-connectivity, trade and people-to-people links.

“We are convinced that this global initiative has an enormous potential. Today more than 65 countries are united around this idea,” or more than 60 percent of the world’s population, the Ukrainian lawmaker said.

Pakistani President Mamnoon Hussain, senior leader of the ruling Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz, said: “The Belt and Road Initiative has been proved to be effective in addressing problems facing mankind. The government and people of Pakistan are willing to work together with the Chinese people to build a global community with a shared future.”

The Belt and Road Initiative “should be able to produce global public goods. I think it can be,” said Harvard professor Joseph Nye.

Former Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk said the initiative is a good instrument to promote win-win cooperation and equal partnership around the globe.

“China firmly adheres to the policy of non-interference. It does not impose its lifestyle upon others, but promotes cooperation. The Belt and Road Initiative is the vivid confirmation to this,” Kravchuk said.

As dozens of countries have joined the initiative, China has become “a major center of attraction” for all the people who wish to achieve development, said Mahmoud Raya, director of the “China in Arab Eyes” news website in Lebanon.

PUT FORWARD CHINA SOLUTION TO GLOBAL CHALLENGES

Over the years, China’s proposals, ranging from the Belt and Road Initiative and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, created to complement multilateral financial institutions like the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, to the strengthening of multilateral institutions such as BRICS and Shanghai Cooperation Organization, have provided alternative solutions to major issues in global development, said Xulio Rios, director of the Spanish Observatory of Chinese Politics.

When the world faces uncertainties arising from persistent economic problems and serious disputes, China takes on greater global responsibilities, and China’s growing role in global affairs means a larger presence of emerging economies and developing countries in global governance, Rios said.

Mauritanian President Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz said Xi’s strategic thinking maps out a bright future for the Chinese people and consolidates the foundation of world peace.

China’s success can provide other countries with inspiring experience in pursuing their own development and in promoting global peace and prosperity.

“Over the past five years, China has shown potential it has to the entire world,” said South Korean ambassador to China Noh Young-min, noting that Beijing has also begun to turn into a key player in the international community for world peace.

“Most of the countries admire the Chinese experience,” Raya from Lebanon added. “That’s why China will always be an inspiration for all the countries looking for peace, security and advancement.”