Cultural Centre Promotes African Week in Sao Paulo

Angola Press Agency Luanda Luanda
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The African Cultural Centre jointly with the consulates in Angola, South Africa, Cabo Verde, Morocco, Namibia, Nigeria, Mozambique and Egypt, will hold on May 21-28 the African week in Sao Paulo city (Brazil), under the celelbration of the Africa Day.

This will be the first event of this kind to take place in Sao Paulo city, whose aim is to show to the Brazilian people the variious domains of the Africa capacities and potentialities, presenting a contemporary continent, thus divulging, valuing and promoting its African culture.

The event is also intended to eliminate stereotypes associated to African countries, disclose the African contributions on sectors such as economy, culture, gastronomy and contribute to boost business between Brazil and this continent.

Angola will be represented by Victoria Models and fashion designer, Loyd Ana Vasconcelos on behalf of AnaLoyd brand, participations are open to business people, artists, musicians, writers, painters, chefs, among others, promoting their art and the Angolan culture and values.


Plane carrying Brazilian soccer team crashes in Colombia, killing 76

A chartered aircraft carrying 81 people including crew and pilots, has crashed on its way to Medellin’s international airport. According to a statement from Colombian aviation officials, the plane declared an emergency between the municipalities of La Ceja and La Union.

Also onboard the aircraft was a Brazilian first division soccer team who was headed to Colombia for a regional tournament final. According to Colombian disaster authorities, three Chapecoense players  survived plane crash. It is believed that only 5 of the 81 passengers onboard survived.

Jose Gerardo Acevedo, regional police commander, told journalists:”Six people were rescued alive, but unfortunately one died. The rest of the occupants unfortunately died. The tragic toll is 76 victims.”

Flightradar24, a flight tracking service on Twitter announced that a tracking signal from flight 2933 was last received when the aircraft was at 15,500 feet, about 30 km from its destination, which sits at an altitude of 7,000 feet.


Pelé: In a League of His Own


Considered the greatest player of all time by many around the world, the legendary Brazilian footballer achieved records which remain unbeaten today. BRICS Journal looks back on his electrifying career.

“I arrived hoping to stop a great man, but I went away convinced I had been undone by someone who was not born on the same planet as the rest of us.” – Costa Pereira

To any fan of the beautiful game, Pelé is much more than just a retired footballer: He is a global icon. Even after 39 years in retirement, the world is yet to produce a soccer player that comes close to Pelé’s talent and skill. Costa Pereira, who was a goal-keeper at the time, is famously quoted saying this of Pelé after playing against his team in 1962: “I arrived hoping to stop a great man, but I went away convinced I had been undone by someone who was not born on the same planet as the rest of us.”

In 1958 the 17-year-old Pele was the youngest player in the FIFA World Cup tournament held in Sweden. He was also the youngest player to ever play in the World Cup, a record which was broken by Norman Whiteside, who was six months younger than Pelé, in 1982.

Born Edson Arantes do Nascimento, he became known as “Pelé” along the way. While there is a tale that he picked up this name because he couldn’t pronounce one of his favourite player’s names – Bilé – properly, Pelé stated in his autobiography that he had no idea what the name meant, or where it came from and neither did his old school buddies.

His 1958 performance cemented his name in the minds of football lovers around the world when the then teen scored two of the five goals that would secure Brazil’s first-ever World Cup win. He went on to secure two more World Cup wins for his country, a feat no other soccer player has achieved to date. At the age of 75, Pelé reflected on that moment in a letter to his younger self with the words: “At the 1958 final, I passed out and fell to the ground. The emotion was simply too much for my body.”

In 1968 he made history yet again, this time with his now famous bicycle kick. The technique is one of the most difficult to execute and rarely perfected. Not only does the player need to maintain good form when executing the move, he must simultaneously exhibit exceptional accuracy and precision when striking the ball. Pelé pulled it off without a hitch in a game against Belgium.

By 1969 Pelé’s fan base had reached Nigeria too and Santos was scheduled to play in the country, which was in the throes of a civil war. The games had been arranged well in advance, and for financial reasons the Brazilians decided not to cancel. The two sides agreed to a 48-hour truce and soldiers from both sides reportedly attended the matches. The war resumed after two-day period had lapsed.

Read more at BRICS JOURNAL…